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EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF CUCUMBERS FOR IMPROVED HEALTH AND SKIN CARE

H. Murad, M.A. Nyc

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2016;5(3):139-141

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Epidemiological and nutritional studies indicate that cucumbers, a fruit in the cucurbitaceae family, have numerous benefits internally, externally and even emotionally. As a food, cucumbers offer superior hydration, as they are about 95% water. They have been used for decades for their anti-inflammatory benefits on skin, soothing properties for digestion, and other therapeutic uses. The following contribution offers an overview of cucumbers, specifically, their use to augment cellular water and address common conditions (i.e.: skin discoloration and aging, cardiovascular and cancerous diseases, bone health, inflammation, and connective tissue disorders).

CITATION:
H. Murad ; M.A. Nyc (2016): Evaluating the potential benefits of cucumbers for improved health and skin care. The Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice (JARCP). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jarcp.2016.108

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SHORT-TERM EFFICACY OF A COMBINATION OF GLUCOSAMINE AND CHONDROITIN SULFATE COMPARED TO A COMBINATION OF GLUCOSAMINE, CHONDROITIN SULFATE AND CALCIUM FRUCTOBORATE (CFB) ON IMPROVEMENT OF KNEE DISCOMFORT CONDITIONS IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS. A COMPARATIVE, DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO CONTROLLED ACUTE CLINICAL STUDY

T. Reyes-Izquierdo, M.J. Phelan, R. Keller, C. Shu, R. Argumedo, Z. Pietrzkowski

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2014;3(4):223-228

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Purpose: To compare and evaluate the effects of treatment with a blend of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, or a blend of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate and calcium fructoborate as compared to a placebo, on joint discomfort. Methods: Individuals with self-reported knee discomfort were randomized and blinded to treatment with a combo containing glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate or glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate and calcium fructoborate. Both groups were compared to placebo. Symptoms of discomfort and joint function were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) before treatment and after 7 and 14 days of treatment. Results: Ninety individuals were selected for this study and were randomly assigned in groups of 30 containing 15 male and 15 female participants to each of three treatment conditions. Treatment with glucosamine combined with chondroitin sulfate and CFB resulted in a statistically significant 24% reduction of mean WOMAC score and a 25% reduction of mean McGill index at day 14 over baseline (p-value = 0.0006 and p-value < 0.0001, respectively). Treatment with placebo or with glucosamine and chondroitin material did not result in significant improvement of the conditions. Conclusions: Results showed that short-term treatment with glucosamine and chondroitin could be efficacious only if used in combination with CFB.

CITATION:
T. Reyes-Izquierdo ; M.J. Phelan ; R. Keller ; C. Shu ; R. Argumedo ; Z. Pietrzkowski (2014): SHORT-TERM EFFICACY OF A COMBINATION OF GLUCOSAMINE AND CHONDROITIN SULFATE COMPARED TO A COMBINATION OF GLUCOSAMINE, CHONDROITIN SULFATE AND CALCIUM FRUCTOBORATE (CFB) ON IMPROVEMENT OF KNEE DISCOMFORT CONDITIONS IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS. A COMPARATIVE, DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO CONTROLLED ACUTE CLINICAL STUDY. The Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice (JARCP). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jarcp.2014.39

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AN OVERVIEW ON ASSESSMENT TESTS FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN MEXICO. THE NATIONAL DEMENTIA SURVEY: A STUDY FROM THE MEXICAN GROUP OF SPECIALISTS IN DEMENTIAS

S.P. Ramírez Díaz, G.Albert Meza, R.E. Albrecht Junghanns, I.C. Zúñiga Gil, M.A. Bedia Reyes, L.A. Barba Valadez, E. Almanza Huante

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2015;4(1):44-49

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Objective: To know the current status of the clinical assessment tests used to evaluate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and memory-related dementias in specific regions throughout Mexico. Design, patients and settings: Patients with objective memory impairment were subjected to a clinical survey in medical centers specializing in memory loss. Each patient’s consultation was conducted like a routine clinical practice. Patient’s data were recorded using an anonymous patient survey. The most prominent behavioral problems were recorded. Results: 1350 patients were tested, 65.19% female (n=880). Out of 1350 patients, 76.59% (n=1034) had been previously diagnosed with any kind of dementia. The most common diagnosis concerning cognitive impairment was AD (54.2%, n=560) and Vascular Dementia (VaD, 19.7%, n=204). Minimental State Examination (MMSE) was performed in all patients and the average score was of 18±7. Katz scale for Activities of Daily Living (ADL) was performed in 49.41% (n=667) of patients, Lawton and Brody scale for Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in 35.78% (n=483), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-Yesavage) in 32.89% (n=444). The most prominent behavioral symptom was apathy (12.15%, n=164).The most frequent concomitant diseases were: high blood pressure in 52.3%, diabetes in 27.0% and Dyslipidemia in 23.4%. Conclusions: Through the assessment of clinical surveys throughout Mexico, it was found that the most common form of dementia is AD and it is followed by VaD. Commonly, the Katz, Lawton and Brody, and the GDS-Yesavage scales are clinical assessment tests that are the most commonly used. There are many differences in the use of tests to evaluate patients with dementia across Mexico. For the first time, we were able to identify tendencies in the assessment of dementias by Mexican physicians.

CITATION:
S.P. Ramírez Díaz ; G.Albert Meza ; R.E. Albrecht Junghanns ; I.C. Zúñiga Gil ; M.A. Bedia Reyes ; L.A. Barba Valadez ; E. Almanza Huante ; Mexican Group of Specialists in Dementias (2015): AN OVERVIEW ON ASSESSMENT TESTS FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN MEXICO. THE NATIONAL DEMENTIA SURVEY: A STUDY FROM THE MEXICAN GROUP OF SPECIALISTS IN DEMENTIAS. The Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice (JARCP). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jarcp.2015.49

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SPECIFIC NATURAL BIOACTIVE TYPE 1 COLLAGEN PEPTIDES ORAL INTAKE REVERSE SKIN AGING SIGNS IN MATURE WOMEN

L. Duteil, C. Queille-Roussel, Y. Maubert, J. Esdaile, C. Bruno-Bonnet, J.-P. Lacour

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2016;5(2):84-92

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Objective: To assess the anti-aging potential of three type I fish collagen hydrolysates (CH1=Naticol® BPMG, CH2=Naticol® HPMG, CH3=Naticol® 1000MG) on skin aging signs for three different body sites of mature women. Design: Double-blind, randomized and Placebo-controlled clinical study. Setting: Centre of Clinical Pharmacology Applied to Dermatology (CPCAD, Nice). Participants: Sixty women aged 46-69 years having skin aging signs on the face. Intervention: Participants were randomized to receive a once daily 5g dose of one of the CHs or Placebo for 8 weeks. Measurements: Skin biomechanics, skin hydration and visual assessment of the crow’s-feet wrinkles were evaluated after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. Subject satisfaction questionnaire and Investigator global efficacy appreciation (IGEA) were also used. Results: Skin biomechanics indicated a significant improvement of skin firmness for the three CHs compared to Placebo, in particular for CH2. An increase of overall skin elasticity for CH3 (p = 0.017) and CH2 (p = 0.044) on the abdomen was also observed. This was corroborated by the significant decrease of the crow’s-feet wrinkle score at week 8 for both CH3 and CH2 (p=0.023 and p=0.014, respectively). Concerning the self-questionnaire, overall the number of positive responses was significantly higher for CH2 compared to Placebo and other CHs. For the IGEA, the number of favorable answers was greater for CH2 than for the Placebo group (80% vs. 36%, p= 0.025). A positive influence of CH treatments could be observed for skin hydration but failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The tested type I fish collagen hydrolysates have beneficial effects on skin quality. In particular, CH2 demonstrated the greatest range of these effects including improvement of skin biomechanics, decrease of wrinkles, good subject satisfaction and no related adverse events.

CITATION:
L. Duteil ; C. Queille-Roussel ; Y. Maubert ; J. Esdaile ; C. Bruno-Bonnet ; J.-P. Lacour (2016): Specific natural bioactive type 1 collagen peptides oral intake reverse skin aging signs in mature women. The Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice (JARCP). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jarcp.2016.97

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DIETARY PATTERNS, NUTRIENT INTAKES, AND NUTRITIONAL AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY STATUS OF SAUDI OLDER ADULTS: A NARRATIVE REVIEW

H. M. Alsufiani, T.A. Kumosani, D. Ford, J.C. Mathers

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2015;4(1):2-11

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Objective: to review the dietary patterns, nutrient intakes, and nutritional and physical activity status of older adults living in Saudi Arabia, to examine geographical differences in such patterns and to identify research gaps in respect of nutrition and physical activity for this population group. Design: Databases and websites (including Pubmed, Scopus, Proquest, Google Scholar and Arab Center for Nutrition) were searched in English and Arabic languages using the following key words: nutritional status, dietary pattern, food pattern, dietary habits, micronutrient intake and status, macronutrients intake, obesity, malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D, physical activity, exercise, Saudi older adults and Saudi elderly. All relevant and available data for both free-living and institutionalized Saudi older adults (> 50 years old or with mean age > 50 years) published in the last 20 years were included in this review. Results: We found that free-living females consumed fewer meals, and less fruits and vegetables, but their reported energy intake was higher than for males. Low intake of vitamins C and D were common in both genders and in those who lived in western and northern regions while low intake of folate and fiber were common in institutionalized people. Omega-3 fatty acids and fish were more highly consumed by older adults living in the coastal region compared with residents in the internal region. Obesity, overweight, vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and physical inactivity were prevalent in free living older adults throughout the country while underweight and iron deficiency anemia were prevalent in institutionalized persons. Conclusion: Information on dietary patterns, nutrient intakes, and nutritional and physical activity status of older adults living in Saudi Arabia is fragmentary and interpretation of the findings is hampered by the lack of population-representative sampling frames and the use of heterogeneous data collection tools. More systematic studies are essential to facilitate objective assessment of these important lifestyle-related factors and to inform public health policies.

CITATION:
H. M. Alsufiani ; T.A. Kumosani ; D. Ford ; J.C. Mather (2015): DIETARY PATTERNS, NUTRIENT INTAKES, AND NUTRITIONAL AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY STATUS OF SAUDI OLDER ADULTS: A NARRATIVE REVIEW. The Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice (JARCP). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jarcp.2015.46

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2019

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2018

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2017

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2016

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JARCP N°03 - september 2016 - See articles

 

JARCP N°02 - june 2016 - See articles

 

JARCP N°01 - march 2016 - See articles

 

2015

JARCP N°04 - december 2015 - See articles

 

JARCP N°03 - september 2015 - See articles

 

JARCP N°02 - june 2015 - See articles

 

JARCP N°01 - march 2015 - See articles

 

2014

JARCP N°04 - december 2014 - See articles

 

JARCP N°03 - september 2014 - See articles

 

JARCP N°02 - june 2014 - See articles

 

JARCP N°01 - march 2014 - See articles

 

2013

JARCP N°04 - december 2013 - See articles

 

JARCP N°03 - september 2013 - See articles

 

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JARCP N°01 - march 2013 - See articles

 

2012

JARCP N°03 - november 2012 - See articles

 

JARCP N°02 - june 2012 - See articles

 

JARCP N°01 - march 2012 - See articles